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On Account of the War 



Plans for this book had been made prior to our 
country's entry into the war. At that time there 
was no question of our being able to fill orders. 
Since then conditions in the lace industry, as in 
every other industry, have changed considerably. 
So today, war orders take precedence over all other 
business, of course, and right now one-third of the 
output of our mills is going to the Government. 
We shall, however, have an excess of materials for 
commercial use and we expect to maintain our 
deliveries as usual. 

THE SCRANTON LACK COMPANY. 



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NET AND .L 



PRACTICAL SUGGESTIONS 

FOR EVERY ROOM IN 

THE HOUSE 




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THE SCRANTON LACE COMPANY 

SCRANTON, PENNSYLVANIA 



CHICAGO, 

REPUBLIC BUILDING 



TORONTO 

108 WELLINGTON STREET. WEST 







Copyright, 1918, by 
The Scranton Lace Company 




The Windows Are the Eyes of the House Frontispiece 

The Art of Window Draping 4 

Halls and Entrance Doors 

An Entrance With Character ............ 6 

The Colonial Entrance Hall ........... 8 

An Adam Corner in the Hall ............ 10 

Libraries 

The Window in the Library ........... 12 

Over the Built-in Bookcases ............ 14 

Net Shades for the Library ............ 16 

Living-Rooms 

A Colonial Living-Room ............. 18 

When the Windows are Wide ........... 20 

Living-Room Casements ............. 22 

The Average Living-Room ............ 24 

A Nook in the Living-Room ............ 26 

Solving a Double Problem ............ 28 

A Suggestion of the Orient ............ 30 

Dining- Rooms 

An Excellent Dining-Room ............ 32 

When Simplicity is Best ............. 34 

The Windows Over the Buffet 36 

The Cheerful Breakfast Room ............ 38 

For the Model Kitchen 40 

The Stairway and Upper Hall 

On the Stairway Landing ............ 42 

Brighten Up the Hallway 44 

Bedrooms 

For the Cretonne Boudoir ............ 46 

Just the Average Bedroom ............ 48 

A Boudoir in Light Colors ............ 50 

Improving Awkward Windows ........... 52 

A Pleasing Dormer Window ............ 54 

The Upstairs Sitting-Room 56 

Completing the Bathroom 58 

Nurseries 

For the Nursery Windows ............ 60 

Sunshine for the Nursery ............ 62 

Leadership in Lace 64 

The Growth of The Scranton Lace Company 65 







96593 




' 



IKE all other arts, the art of window draping consists, 

chiefly, of putting the right thing in the right place. 

Perhaps no other item of home decoration offers such 

wide scope for the exercise of good taste within the 

limits of moderate cost. For the beauty of a curtain 

is not in its intrinsic value but in its design and in the skill with 

which it is draped to meet the two-fold requirements of serving its 

purpose usefully, and harmonizing with the room. 

Points to be Considered 

In choosing the material and determining the style of hanging, several 
points must be considered. The architecture of the window is impor- 
tant; so also is the interior decoration of the room. If the room 
is dark the curtain must let in daylight. If there is a flood of sun- 
light, it will be necessary to tone down the glare. A window directly 
on the street or commanded by the windows of near neighbors must 
be screened to secure privacy without excluding light. There are 
appropriate styles for living-rooms, others for dining-rooms, still others 
for bedrooms. It is to assist in the solution of such problems that 
this volume has been prepared. 

Characteristic Windows 

Obviously, it is impossible to show every variety of window in every 
room in the house. It is equally impossible to show all of the many 
attractive ways of hanging curtains, or the thousands of beautiful 
designs offered by Scranton Laces and Filet Nets. 

In these pages the attempt has been rather to illustrate the most general 
types of windows, and to suggest for each, one good up-to-date method 
of draping curtains, together with three Scranton designs which would 




It is our hope that not only will the actual illustrations be of direct 
assistance to many women in deciding upon the draping of their own 
windows, but also that the book as a whole will serve to demonstrate 
the fact that it is always possible to find the right curtain for any window. 

Write to our Service Department 

For those who have unusual problems for which they cannot find 
specific suggestions in this book, The Scranton Lace Company main- 
tains a Service Department which is always ready to answer inquiries 
and make suggestions through the mails. Experts in interior deco- 
ration will give you the benefit of their practical experience. This 
service is rendered without charge. All you need to do is to write 
to the Service Department of The Scranton Lace Company, Scranton, 
Pa., stating your problem in careful and complete detail, and you will 
receive prompt and full reply. 

You can also obtain from us, or from the merchant who shows you this 
book, a copy of our booklet entitled, "New Outlooks For Every Home," 
which contains the same material as this volume, but printed in 
handy size for use at home. 



Scranton Embroideries 

Those who have learned to rely upon Scranton Laces and Filet Nets 
will be interested to know that we are now offering a wide and 
beautiful line of Scranton Embroideries. The same excellence of 
design, the same high quality of materials and fine workmanship which 
have distinguished other Scranton productions will be found in these 
exquisite embroideries. Ask your merchant to show them to you. 



THE SCRANTON LACE COMPANY 




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No. 10230.— Still another choice, of r; 
same quality, in charming pattern: 42 ^J 
inches wide; white, ivory or natural. )-, 

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An Entrance with Character 



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Character and dignity are as desirable 
in the outward appearance of the 
home, as they are essential to the 
bearing of a self-respecting person. 
Here is a treatment of an entrance 
door that has both of these qualities. 
It is of English derivation. 

A simple net is drawn tautly on a ; s- 
inch brass rod placed just above and be- 
low the glass (See A in the diagram). 
Back of this is hung a puffed shade 
made of soft silk which can be raised 
or lowered as occasion demands. 

The fan-shaped glass panel above the 
door is screened with a shirring of 
net of the same design as used on the 
door. A light wooden frame about 
two-and-one-half inches wide is made 
the exact shape and size of the open- 
ing (See B). The net is tacked to the 
curved edge of the frame and then 
drawn to the center where a small 
rosette of the net is used to cover 
the uneven edtres. 





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The Colonial Entrance Hall 



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First impressions of people are lasting, 
and are often the determining factors 
in friendships. So first impressions of 
our homes give a keynote to the tastes 
of the occupants. 

For this reason it is of paramount im- 
portance that the nets or laces selected 
for the entrance door be of a char- 
acter that will lend a pleasing dignity 
to the entrance. 

When small patterned nets are shirred 
top and bottom on rods as shown, 
about 75 per cent, should be allowed 
for fullness. A one-inch heading is 
used above and below the casing in 
which the -N-inch brass rod is slipped. 

A light, wooden frame (see A in the 
diagram) is made which exactly fits 
inside the trim of the fan-shaped tran- 
som. The net is tacked to the outer 
edge of this frame and drawn tautly 
to the center of the lower edge where 
it is finished with a rosette of the net. 




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An Adam Corner in the Hall 



A corner in the hall, next to the 
entrance, probably plays a more im- 
portant role in creating a favorable 
first impression than any other part 
of the house. And when the furnish- 
ings are suggestive of the Adam Style, 
the curtains should be sheer and deli- 
cate in design to secure the best effect. 

Two lengths, 45 inches in width, 
are used and hang straight to 
the sill from a -\-inch brass rod 
placed just inside the window 
shade (see A in the diagram). 
Each curtain is made with a 
one-inch casing at the top 
through which the brass rod 
is slipped — a one-inch hem 
down the center edge and a two- 
inch hem across the bottom. A 
simple roll hem is all that is 
necessary at the back edges. 

The overdrapery of silk or vel- 



vet is hung from a one-inch brass tub- 
ing, fastened to the window trim (See 
B). One width of material should be 
used for each curtain which falls 
straight to the floor. The valance is 
fastened to a wooden cornice, (See C), 
which is held in place by wire supports 
placed just above the one-inch tube. 



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No. 9220. A popular, plain Filet Net, 
lower priced grade : 36 and 40 inches 
wide ; white, ivory or natural. 



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No. 10834. Good figured design in 
medium priced Filet Net: 40 inches r ;|| -f 
wide ; white, ivorv or natural. -l^vl 



No. 10790. Pleasing pattern in medium 
priced Filet Net : in 42 and 80 inch 
widths : white, ivory or natural. 



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The Window in the Library 



The net for this type of library win- 
dow should be plain or very simple 
in design. At the large central win- 
dow the semi-draped treatment may 
be effectively used, while at the small 
side windows the net should fall per- 
fectly straight reaching 
just to the window si 

A -' s -inch brass rod can 
be bent to con- 
form with the top 
of the circular win- 
dow. A bracket 
fixture is needed 
to hold the rod at 
the central window 
(See A in the dia- 
gram) while a 
socket fixture is 
used at the small 
side windows (See 
B). A semi-draped 




effect is obtained at the central win- 
dow by running a small cord, the 
color of the net, through small ivory 
rings sewed to the back of the cur- 
tains. The cord is slipped through a 
ring screwed to the jamb of the win- 
dow (See C) and the cur- 
tain drawn back as desired. 

The dotted line indicates 
the curtain when 
adjusted. The cur- 
tains at the top are 
made with a one- 
inch heading-above 
the casing. The 
center edges 
should have a one- 
inch hem and 
the bottom a two- 
inch hem — 75 per 
cent, be i n g a 1 - 
lowed for fullness. 



f 




13 



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J *~. r*- *~" J *- -*- -*■ * i- -t-_l 1 i A 1 * 1-.^ -^ t ±..±. .L.A..1 A A 1 * k t , ,^ , , ft ftiiili ||ff||llll!l ill Ai A l | li ft i ff| M *^l...t..J fft , | . l V.,TT^™lw..,4 , ^l rV T^^~.^™^^ 




i-*o. lu.iji. — aunoursi paiiern, rnei 

Net, of the cheaper grade; 30 and 36 

j."j inches wide; white, ivory or natural. 

1 ^^7^T 1 7 1 T 1 T , T^T^T 1 T 1 T^.^ ,1 T 1 T 1 T T 7 T 7 T 7 T 7 r 



Over the Built-in Bookcases 



The best choice of nets for casement 
windows above built-in bookcases 
are those showing small patterns. 
The curtains should hang perfectly 
straight and just clear the top of the 
bookcase. 

The net shown in the illustration is 
woven with a strong edge so well 
designed that no other finish is neces- 
sary. A loose casing made at the top 
through which the rod is run, and a 
two inch hem at the bottom is all the 
sewing required before the curtains 
are read) to hang. Frequently the sides 
of the net are finished 
with simply a selvedge 
edge. When such a net 
is chosen, a one-inch 
hem should be made 
at the center edge of 
the curtain and a roll 
hem at the back edge. 



Overdraperies at this type of casement 
window are almost indispensable. 
First, — they take the place of shades 
and should be wide, so that when 
drawn they will cover the entire win- 
dow. Second, — they add a charming 
bit of color and decoration to the 
room. These overdraperies are made 
with a pinch pleated heading, back of 
which are sewed brass rings, which 
slip easily on the rod. 

The fixture carries two rods (See A 
in the diagram) from which the net 
and overdraperies are hung. 




i 




14 




15 



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4 K 

,H No. 10725. -Fine Filet Net, reproduc- r 

»hJ ing real Italian filet of block design ; (-] 

df/L H 45 inches wide: white, ivory or natural. \~ 

- i h 1 



Net Shades for the Library 



Many nets are most attractive when 
used as roller shades. These are 
mounted and operated exactly the 
same as the linen shades. A flat tape 
is stitched down the sides to ensure 
a very strong edge, and across the 
lower edge where indicated by a 
dotted line (see A in the diagram), a 
brass rod is placed. This is held in 
position by a casing made of the net 
and stitched to the back of the shade. 
Tbe brass rod, which should be 
covered with muslin, is of sufficient 
weight to hold the shade well in place. 
The pattern in tbe net should be used 
as a guide when shaping the bottom 
edge. A pleasing effect is obtained by 
finishing with lace and tassels. 
The overdraperies are of a sheer sun- 
fast material but the valance is made 
of a heavier fabric. 

The valance is tacked to a wooden 
cornice (see B) which is held in place 




with angle-irons screwed to the trim 
of the window. Sockets carrying a 
• ? s -inch brass rod are fastened to the 
inside of the cornice, ami the over- 
draperies hang from this rod. 



W°l 




16 




17 




No. 10820.- Unusually good medium K 
priced Filet Net, Adam design : 47 and f 
76 inches wide; white, ivory or natural, k 

V T . T . T J T . T . T . f . T . T . T .TT. T . T V T . T V ? T ^g 



A Colonial Living-Room 



u 



The ivory tones of the woodwork in 
this Colonial living-room furnish a set- 
ting for the simplest of hangings. 

The net curtains fall straight to the 
sill from a ^-inch brass rod (See A 
in the diagram). The rod is run 
through a one-inch casing at the top, 
above which is a one-inch heading. 







Two widths are used at the center 
window, and one width only at the 
side windows. A one-inch hem is 
used down the center edges, a two 
and one-half inch hem at the bottom 
and a simple roll hem at the back 
edges. The transom curtains are 
made in the same manner. 

The overdraperies are meant to take 
the place of shades, and are 
made with a 2 ) 2 -inch 
pinch pleated heading. 
Back of the pleats are 
rings which slip easily 
upon the pole, making 
it simple to operate the 
curtain, which should 
cover the entire window 
when drawn. The brass 
rod carrying the over- 
draperies is placed on 
the trim (See B). 



-H 



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19 



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No. 9101.— One of the staple numbers 
in medium priced plain Filets; 42 and 
80 inches wide; white, ivory or natural. 



>' t i r—yr"! i * i ii 




No. 10121. — The new stripe effect in - 
the lower priced Filet Net; 36 inches >■ 
wide ; white, ivory or natural. 

i 




No. 9522.— A popular pattern in 
lower priced Filet Nets; 40 i 
wide; white, ivory or natural. 



a 



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When the Windows Are Wide 



The treatment of the living-room of 
the solarium type should be partic- 
ularly simple if the most desirable 
effect is to be obtained. The wide 
window expanses of such rooms, ad- 
mitting as they do a veritable flood of 
sunlight, afford an excellent oppor- 
tunity for the hanging of simple nets. 
A fixture carrying two rods is placed 



upon the trim of the windows. On 
the inside rod is hung the decorative 
Filet Net and on the outer the over- 
drapery of gaily colored cretonne. 
The pinch pleated valance is tacked 
to a flat wooden board, which is placed 
on the window trim just above the 
rods carrying the nets and side cur- 
tains. (See A in the diagram). 



rmiTini iTiTTrrrfffTBH 




A 



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21 



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No. 10648. -Popular lower priced Filet 
." Net; in 30- and 36-inch widths; white, 
1 ivorv or natural. 



kS .T T . i ■ . T y r .TT T Y T . T . i . i . 1 1 < , i . f 7 T7*rrn\& 




No. 10319.— Another good lower priced 
Filet Net; in 30- and 36 -Inch widths; 
white, ivory or natural 





No. 10326. - Especially attractive lower 
priced Filet Net, in small figures; 40 
inches only; white, ivory or natural. 






ftiimiumn 



Living-Room Casements 



One has very little choice in the way 
to treat casement windows which 
are hung to open into the room. 
If the windows are to be operated 
with ease the curtains must be held 
firmly in place. This can be done by 
shirring the net on 
^ -inch brass rods 
placed at the top 
and bottom of the 
window frame. 

If a Filet Net is 
chosen, allow 75 per 
cent, for fullness. 
A one-inch heading 
is made above and 
below the casing in 
which the rod is 
run and the net 
drawn in place. 

It is true that over- 
draperies always add 



a charming bit of color to any room 
and these are sometimes used at the 
ends of a casement group. But as a 
rule, one should rely upon upholstery 
materials, table runners, lamp shades, 
etc. for the touches of color. 




"•? 



ZGSS 

frmixmx, 




99 




23 



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Ixl kl 




weave, moderate price ; 3 pieces ready 
to hang; about 2% yards long. 75 t 
inches wide; white, ivory or natural, r 



. ryt ,^ . TYr^T * 




No. 9300. — Good lower priced Dutch 
stvle, 3 pieces ready to hang; about 
2% yards long, 82 inches wide ; white, 
ivory or natural. 




No. 9983.- Fine Dutch style medium 
priced Filet weave, 3 pieces ready to 
hang; about 2l{ yards long, 75 inches 
wide ; white, ivory or natural. 



p-.T t TnT,T a T ,T a T c T . T.T, 



h 



The Average Living-Room 



□ 



In many living-rooms are to be found 
the straight up and down, rectangular 
windows that, because of their very 
simplicity, often present considerable 
of a problem. And yet a little thought 
and an equally small amount of work, 
make possible a treatment that is 
highly satisfactory and pleasing. 

When surrounding conditions are 
such that overdraperies must be elimi- 
nated, the Dutch window treatment 
solves the problem. The valance 
hanging between the curtains serves 
to cover the otherwise exposed cur- 
tain rod and shade roller, giving a soft, 
finished appearance to the upper part 
of the window and leaving the lower 
portion well exposed. 

These curtains are manufactured 2 '4 
yards in length with firm edges. All 
the sewing required on such curtains 
is heading up the top preparatory to 



ffl v>n-f7' 




Hanging. Make a 1- 
inch heading above the 
casing and hang from a -\-inch brass 
rod with goose-neck bracket fixture. 




24 




25 



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A Nook in the Living-Room 



For groupings of various sized win- 
dows the panel curtains are particularly 
adaptable. The design is so carefully 
wrought out that the width of the cur- 
tain may be adjusted to many sizes of 
windows, while the length may be 
similarly adjusted up to three yards. 

These are hung from -N-inch brass 
rods placed on the window jamb, or 
they may be placed on the trim if it is 
advantageous to cover the woodwork. 



All the sewing required upon such 
curtains is making a loose casing at the 
top through which the rod is slipped. 

The plain overdrapery, which hangs 
straight to the apron of the sill, serves 
to accentuate the beauty of the net. 
The fixture carrying the valance and 
side drapery holds two rods. From 
the inner one hangs the side curtains. 
To the outer, the valance is attached 
by means of hooks. 





27 



loir 



I * b<< 



1SZEL 



TSTR 







9623. Pleasing double border, 
somewhat after the Egyptian style ; 46 



wide; white, ivory or natural. ' 1/1 ij inches wide ; white, ivory or natural. H jy 

mm k ■ 



Solving a Double Problem 



u 



A novel treatment for a double-hung 
window is a separate set of curtains 
for the upper and lower sashes. These 
are hung from 3., -inch brass rods 
placed on the trim of the window 
(see A in the diagram) and each is 
made with a 
1-inch heading 
above the casing 
at the top, with 
a 2-inch hem at 
the lower edge. 
The net suitable 
for this use is 36 
inches in width 
and is finished at 
both sides with a 
strong, well pro- 
portioned bor- 
dered edge, One 
width of this 
net is used on 
each of the 




French doors, being shirred at top and 
bottom and drawn in place on a \i- 
inch rod. 

The drapery valance is mounted upon 
a flat wooden cornice placed on the 
trim and held fast by angle irons (see 
B). The draperies 
proper are hung 
from a J^-inch brass 
rod (see C) placed 
just beneath the 
cornice, and held 
back with tie-backs 
' *T I DIM IflW i II °f the same material. 
Omit the valance 
at the doors. Make 
the drapery with a 
pinch pleated head- 
ing. Hooks sewed 
back of the pleats 
(See D), slip into the 
eyes of the rings that 
slide on a brass pole. 





28 




29 



prrr 



Ifii M 



IM N 




No. 10903.— Japanese panel effect, in 
the finer Filet Net ; for shades or pan- 
els or regular draping; 5 panels wide 
or 45 inches; white, ivory or natural. 



ftwim q u ' i r j f — 



T T 7 T 7 T 7" r 7 T 7 T 7 



'rry^r.i'T.v. 




Net ; for shades, door panels and 
general draping; width and colors 
~ same as No. 10903. 



agJ,T l T,T,T,,T,TT,T,T,T^T i T,T t Ta 



"M~T£ 



wzrm 



^y.-r.T.^T.T^.T.T^r.T.T-.T.XT.T.X.T.T.T.-tg 



A Suggestion of the Orient 



The vogue for furnishings from the 
Far East affords an opportunity for a 
distinct variation from conventional 
treatment, and if not overdone adds a 
decidedly artistic touch to the well- 
furnished home. 

For this particidar window a Filet Net 
with characteristic Oriental design is 
suggested. The net is mounted upon 
a wooden shade roller (See A in the 
diagram) and operates the same as the 
ordinary shade. A flat tape is stitched 
down the side edges in order to give 
the necessary strength. At the lower 
edge of the shade, just ahove the fin- 
ishing edge, a small brass rod is placed 
in a casing which serves as a weight to 
hold the shade in place. The tassel 
pulls add much to the finished effect 
of the shade. 

The valance of unique Oriental de- 
sign is made of plain green velvet and 




mounted upon a wooden frame (See 
B) which is held in place on the trim 
of the window with wire supports (See 
C). The exposed portion of this frame 
is painted black like the standing 
woodwork in the room. 
The rich and decorative overdraperies 
of green and gold brocade fall straight 
to the floor from a one-inch brass tub- 
ing placed on the trim of the window 
just below the wooden frame holding 
the valance. 



fam rrn n f j 
55555 



n 






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30 




31 



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Tra 




No. 10233.- Conventional pattern of 
; the popular Filet Net block type; 45 
-> inches wide ; white, ivory or natural. 

^■^.T l T.T -.- r,T-,T-,T-.-y ,T7T-, I , I , I , ■ , I , ■ , » , l^5| 



- No. 10651. Good filet block. Italian 
style, better medium grade; 40 inches 
*j wide ; white, ivorv or natural. 

& 



't'l'>'t'- 1 ''n l tMM'»' 



No. 10865. Popular pattern of Filet 
| Net block, conventional design: 45 
J S/y£jr-i inches wide; white, ivorv or natural. } 

d ll , ,,JZl 



TIiJjjLslLlJjJ. 



U 



An Excellent Dining-Room 



The treatment of this dining-room is 
sure to make a strong appeal, because 
to the discriminating taste, the com- 
bination of crystal, damask and fine 
nets is always irresistible. 

The windows above the recessed seat 
are curtained with a Filet Net show- 
ing a block pattern. On account of 
the pronounced design, very little full- 
ness should be allowed. Two lengths 
are used at the center window and 
one length at each of the narrow side 
windows. These should hang straight 
and just clear the window sill. At the 
top a one-inch heading is made above 
the loose casing which holds the rod. 
A one-inch hem is turned at the cen- 
ter edges, there is a two-and-one-half- 
inch hem across the bottom and a roll 
hem at the back edges. These are 
hung from a ^i-inch brass rod placed 
on the window trim (See A in the dia- 



1 , ->. ! 



1 L 




□ 



gram). The overdraperies are hung 
from the casing of the recess. The 
side curtains of a figured fabric are 
caught back in soft folds with bands 
of plain green velvet, the same as used 
for the valance. 

The overdrapery is hung from a one- 
half-inch brass rod (See B). The 
valance is tacked to a flat wooden 
cornice (See C), which is supported 
by angle irons and placed just above 
the rod holding the over-curtain. 




32 




33 




When Simplicity is Best 



One of the most frequent problems 
met with in the dining-room is the 
row of several casement windows, 
flanked on either side by a long win- 
dow. In such cases the most satis- 
factory results are obtained by strict 
adherence to dainty patterns and by 
making the curtains and overdraper- 
ies as simple as possible. 

The Filet Net curtains are shirred on 
a -N-inch brass rod and hang straight 
to the sill. These are drawn [back 
slightly though the panes may be 
covered if one wishes. 

The fixture used holds two rods and 
therefore, carries both sets of curtains 
(See A in the diagram). Upon the 
outside rod is hung the overdraperv, 
which is made with a 1-inch heading- 
above the casing, a 1-inch hem at the 
sides and a 3-inch hem across the 
bottom. The draperies at the case- 




ments hang straight to 
the sill, while those at 
the longer windows are 
caught back with bands 
of buckram covered 
with the drapery ma- 
terial. The nets, hung 
from the inner rod, are 
made with a loose cas- 
ing at top without heading, a 1-inch 
hem at the center edges, a 2-inch 
hem at the bottom and a simple roll 
hem at the back edges. 




35 



r^w 



m m 



iX! i*i 



_:7 rir 




The Windows Over the Buffet 



In the dining-rooms of a great many 
modern dwellings the architects 
have placed a group of windows 
above built-in furniture. Such win- 
dows frequently offer an opportunity 
for pleasing decorative effects. 

The group of casement windows 
above the built-in buffet in this dining- 
room has been curtained with one 
width of net at either end and one 
width over each mullion. These cur- 
tains hang straight to the sill and are 
made with a loose casing at the top 
which is to hold the rod, a 1-inch hem 
at the sides and a 2j^-inch hem across 
the bottom edu'e. 

The overdrapery is used simply to 
outline the window and add a needed 
bit of color. One width of mulberry 
material is hung at either end of 
the group. A shallow pinch pleated 
valance carries the color across the 



top and forms an attractive frame. 
The overdraperies and nets are hung 
from a fixture earning two -%-inch 




brass rods (see A in the diagram) which 
are fastened to the trim of the window. 
On the inner rod hang the net 
curtains and on the outer the over- 
draperv. The pinch pleated valance 
is tacked to a wooden cornice (see B). 




37 



,iznir 



!-.i ..•> 



sens: 




The Cheerful Breakfast-Room 



Owing to the diversity in size, shape 
and grouping of windows in the ma- 
jority of breakfast and dining-rooms, 
an excellent opportunity is offered for 
the display of originality and individ- 
uality in the hangings. 

Rooms of this character should, above 
all else, radiate cheerfulness. The 
wall spaces are, as a rule, small, so one 
must depend largely upon the hang- 
ings and furnishings for color. It is 
for just such rooms that the painted 
and decorated furniture has been 
found to be so helpful and pleasing. 

A pair of net curtains is 

hung at each window. 

Between the windows, as 

well as at the ends, is hung 

one width of gaily figured 

cretonne. A shaped and pleated va 

ance is made to extend over each 

group of windows. This is tacked 



to a flat wooden board (See A in the 
diagram) which is placed on the trim 
of the window just above a fixture 
carrying two } 2-inch brass rods, one 
for the overdrapery (See B) and one 
for the net (See C). 
The net curtains are made with a 
loose casing at the top through which 
the rod is slipped. A one-inch hem 
should be used down the center edge. 
A two-inch hem at the bottom and a 
roll hem at the back edge. 
This treatment will produce a very 
attractive and desirable effect. 





39 



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TEElir 




TOn. 



^-.^ 



. T f T T . T I 



4 N_. 

L hemstitched voile curtain ; 2% yar 
Ions ; white, ivory or natural. 
'Ill-- » ' 1—- I'l'l'l't'i'l^l'l'l'i'l^i'l'i* 



An exceptionally Rood plain 
ds 



m 
M 



w&. 



y>'^^^ 1 -^'^^ , ^^'^'^'^"^'-^'^'^'-^'^'^'^ T -^'-\'^f !|=^ Py-lTZTj- 1 J-' -L-'-^-'-i- -A. v .^- -_l, J _l.'.k. v .J. 1 -J- J .^-' ■J-'-i-'-l.'-L'. 




No. 238. A very popular plain hem- 
stitched marquisette curtain ; 2% yards 
Ions ; white, ivory or natural. 




No. 422. A good scrim curtain for 
inexpensive use. plain hemstitched : 
2*2 yards long: white, ivory or natural. 



rr^ 



if 



;- 



■H 



For the Model Kitchen 



Anv room in which a woman must 
necessarily spend so much time as she 
spends in the kitchen, is deserving of 
the very hest planning. The archi- 
tects of today are giving much thought 
to the architectural details 
of the kitchen and are help- 
ing to solve the prohlem of 
sanitation and convenience, 
and tf) some extent, the 
question of light. But the 
latter is still largely the 
housewife's prohlem while 
the equally important matter 
of affording a restful center 
for the eyes, is entirely so. 
The kitchen window affords 
just such a center and it is important, 
therefore, that the treatment he right. 

Sturdy curtains of scrim, voile or mar- 
quisette will withstand the inevitable 
steam vapors and frequent tubbings. 



These are made from 32 to 35 inches 
in width and two-and-one-half yards 
long. The center and bottom edges 
are finished with a two-inch hem- 
stitched hem. All the sewing required 




is the making of a loose casing at the 

top, above which is a one-inch head- 
ing. The curtains should hangstraight 
to the sill from a -\-inch nickel rod 
supported by projecting brackets. 



m 

TTTTinTrt, 




41) 




41 




i. ■*. -fa'.A. -h. -fci A ■fa'A -fai - ^.^ 

No. 11116.— Popular best grade, MAID- r - 
O-NET, in fine Filet Net with lace sl- 
edge; VA yards lone. 40 inches wide; 
white, ivory or natural. 



! ■■:>T? 



TTXT *> ' ' , * , T , 1 . T I . t 1 



No. 11106 Another exceptional 
MAID-O-NET, fine grade of Filet Net 
with lace edge; 2 l s yards long, 40 



No. 11107. Equally good MAID-O- 
NET, fine Filet Net border of Adam 
design, lace edge; 2 1 .- yards long. 40 



Willi liH-C cilKt • * a jjiua uMi-;. ->v , i ; / -j •"• - - J «■* — - ■"■■*». ™ . 

inches wide: white, ivory or natural, f j inches wide: white, ivory or natural. £, 



On the Stairway Landing 



The curtains for casement windows 
having a stationary transom, are hung 
straight to the sill from ^-inch pro- 
jection brackets. To prevent the rod 
from sagging across the broad sweep, 
a support should be used at either 
side of the central windows (See A 
in the diagram). 



A single curtain is hung at the side 
windows and one pair hung at each 
of the other windows in the recess. 
At top the curtains have a one-inch 
heading above the casing carrying the 
rod. A two-inch hem is used at the 
center edge and across the bottom. 
On the edge is placed a narrow lace. 




42 




43 



trnr 



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IKi-T 

Bfll.j No. 9717.— Stylish stripe net. in the k 
regular weave, better grade : 42 inches ^ 
wide : white, ivory or natural. f m 

CTaTagVT.'.^T.T.T.T.TTXTH^ 



Brighten Up the Hallway 



Special thought should be given the 
treatment of every hallway window, 
in order that a maximum amount of 
light may be admitted. This object 
can best be attained by omitting the 
overdraperies, and taking especial care 
to select the right kind of net. 

At this particular window a sheer net 
is shirred on a ^-inch brass rod with 
a one-inch heading above the casing, 
and is caught back about one-third of 
the distance from the top in soft folds. 
A touch of color is added by binding 
tbe center edges and bottom with a 
colored taffeta about one -inch in 
width. The tie-backs are made of 
the same taffeta. A metal rosette (See 
A in the diagram) will also give an 
individual touch if used in the place 
of the ordinary invisible hook. A 
simple roll bem is used at the back. 
edges of the curtains. Seventy-five 
per cent, should be allowed for fullness. 




U 




44 




45 



WW - 



IXl i* 



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Tgrff? 







The charm of the boudoir with pan- 
elled walls and cretonne covered fur- 
niture, is centered about the broad 
windows. These may be so draped 
as not to exclude the sunlight and yet 
Lnve the needed touch of color to en- 
hance the opening and take away the 
bare effect of the frame work, by 
using a shaped and pleated valance of 
the same cretonne as is used for the 
furniture covering. For the down 
curtains at either end use a fabric 
showing a solid color which will em- 
phasize one of the predominating 
colors in the cretonne. These are 
caught back with bands covered with 
the curtain material. 

One pair of bordered Filet Net cur- 
tains is used at each window. These 
are manufactured 36 inches in width 
and two-and-one-half yards in length. 
All that is required is the making 
of a loose casing at the top through 



which the rod is run. The net 
curtains should reach to the sill only. 

The down curtains at either end of 
the group should reach to the apron 
of the sill. A loose casing for the 
rod is made at the top — a one-inch 
hem at the sides and a three-inch 
hem across the bottom. The bands 
which hold back these curtains are 
made of stiff buckram covered with 
the same material as the curtains. One 
fixture holding two rods carries both 
curtains (See A in the diagram). 
The shaped and pleated valance is 
mounted upon a flat board which is 
held in place by angle-irons attached 
to the frame of the window (See H). 



W 




46 




47 



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3rf 








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No. 9651. — Especially tjood cathedral 
glass effect, allover net. Swiss weave 
40inches wide: white, ivory or natural. 





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No. 10792.— Exceptionally attractive, 
allover small square, Swiss weave: 40 



T : 

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. 10157. Very neat and popular, all- rj | 
over small square, Swiss weave : 40 H 



inches wide; white, ivory or natural. -^ V 1 ,' j inches wide; white, ivory or natural, to 



Just the Average Bedroom 



Nets frequently serve a two-fold pur- 
pose in bedrooms. The same design 
vised at the windows may often be 
converted into attractive bedcoveriny;s. 
For the average size window, one 
width of material is sufficient for each 
curtain. A three-inch ruffle with a 
one-half-inch heading is used down 
the center edge with two ruffles across 
the bottom. The valance is finished 
with a niching at the top and two 
ruffles across the bottom. The foun- 
dation of the valance upon which the 
ruffles are mounted is made with a 
casing at the top through which the 
rod is run. This section of the val- 
ance is practically plain, there being 
just enough fullness allowed to make 
it fall from the rod without drawing. 
This design requires eight yards of 
material for the average window. 
The fixture upon which the curtains 
ami valance are mounted carriestwo }4- 
inch brass roils. (See A in the diagram). 




A bedcover, for a full size bed, will 
require six and one-half yards. 
The window shade is made of cre- 
tonne and is mounted and operated 
the same as an ordinary shade. When 
the lower edge of the shade is shaped 
as shown, sew a casing at the back, 
where indicated by dotted line, in 
which a ^-inch brass rod is placed. 







48 




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No. 9120.— Filet point d'esprit net of 
fine quality; 42 inches wide; white. 
ivory or natural. 



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No. 10716. An exceptionally good 
figured pattern of Filet Net; 52 inches 
wide ; white, ivory or natural. 



No. 10714. — A. very pleasing stripe 
effect in fine quality Filet Net; 52 
inches wide; white, ivory or natural 








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A Boudoir in Light Colors 



In boudoirs where the color scheme 
is delicate and the furnishings light in 
character, plain fine Filet Nets, or 
those showing small patterns, are best 
suited for the windows. 



II 



1 




A ^ -inch brass rod is placed at the 
top and bottom of the casement win- 
dows as well as on the transoms 
(See A in the diagram) upon which 
the net is tautly drawn. Where tine 
Filet Nets are used, allow 100 per cent, 
for fullness. A one-inch hem 
is used at the sides and a one- 
inch heading is made 
above and below the cas- 
ing which holds the rod. 

The overdraperies, 
which have a pleated val- 
ance between the side 
hangings, are hung upon 
a J^-inch brass rod 
placed on the trim (See 
B), and are held in place 
by sewing a brass ring back of each 
pleat through which the rod is 
slipped. A straight rod must be pur- 
chased and bent to conform to the 
curved shape of the windows. 



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No. 10219. New novelty stripe effect; ■ 
better grade Filet Net: 46 and 70 inches f 
wide; white, ivory or natural. 





No. 10823. Striking pattern in Filet 
Net of the better medium grade ; 46 
inches wide: white, ivory or natural. 



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Instill Popular small figured pat 
, better medium grade Filet Net: L." 
ncheswide: white, ivory or natural. i_^ 

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Improving Awkward Windows 



Windows which are often awkwardly 
grouped may be made attractive fea- 
tures if properly curtained. 

In this room, for instance, the interest 
is centered within the boundary of the 
two windows. The overdraperies, 
which reach to the floor, and the val- 
ance which extends across the win- 
dows and intervening space, serves to 
make a unit of the two separate win- 
dows, forming an attractive setting 
for the cretonne - covered dressing 
table and mirror. 

The net curtains are made with a one- 
inch heading above the casing which 
holds the rod; a one-inch hem at 
the center edy;es, a 2j4 -inch hem 
across the bottom and a simple roll 
hem at the back edges. Two widths 
of net are used at each window and 
ban g straight to the apron of the sill. 

A fixture carrying two rods is used to 



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hold the net curtains and side draper- 
ies (See A in the diagram). The net 
is hung from the inner rod and the 
side drapery from the outer one. The 
valance is tacked to a flat wooden 
cornice (See B) which is held in place 
with angle irons. 

The bedcover and [bureau scarf of 
lace are placed over a soft rose color. 
For the bedcover there are a number 
of attractive Scranton designs. 



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A Pleasing Dormer Window 



The familiar dormer window fre- 
quently presents a problem that lends 
itself to a very happy solution, provid- 
ing a simple treatment is decided 
upon, and due care is exercised in 
selecting the nets and overdraperies. 
One fixture carrying two rods is all 
that is necessary for hanging curtains 
at windows treated as this group. 
One width of 36-inch material is used 
at either end of the group with a 
shirred valance extending 
between the side curtains. 
The valance and side cur- 
tains are placed on the out- 
side rod (See A in the dia- 
gram) and the net curtains 
are hung from the inside 
rod (see B). The overdrap- 
eries and valance are made 
with a one-inch heading 
above the casing, through 
which the brass rod is 



slipped. A one-inch hem is used at 
the bottom of the valance and down 
the inside edges of the side curtains. 
A two-inch hem is used at the bottom 
of the side curtains, which hang to 
the apron of the sill. 

The net curtains are made with a 
loose casing at the top (without head- 
ing) through which the brass rod is 
slipped; a one-inch hem at the sides 
and a two-inch hem at the bottom. 
These curtains reach just to the sill. 




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No. 10141. Good imitation Filet, 
geometric-ill figure, moderate price; 
42 inches wide : white, ivory or natural. 



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No. %46.— Moderate priced imitation 
Filet weave, popular stripe effect: 42 
inches wide : white, ivory or natural. 



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No. %48. Another sty 
Filet, moderate price, oriei 
42 inches wide; white, ivory 



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The Upstairs Sitting-Room 



The plain, ordinary sitting-room win- 
dow that at first glance appears to 
have no particular individuality, really 
offers very excellent decorative possi- 
bilities. For when it is curtained 
with suitable laces, in combination 
with overdraperies which emphasize 
the beauty of the net, such a window 
becomes decidedly attractive. 

For the average size window one 
width of net is sufficient for each cur- 
tain — a one-inch hem is used down 
the center edge, a two-inch hem across 
the bottom and a simple roll hem at 
the back edge. A loose casing, with- 
out heading, is made at the top which 
holds the rod. 

A fixture carrying two rods is used 
(See A in the diagram). The over- 
drapery hangs from the outside rod 
ami the nets from the inner rod. The 
valance is mounted on a broad metal 




row heading. 

The net cur- 
tains should be 
made to reach to the sill only, while 
the overdraperies should reach to the 
apron of the sills. 

This treatment will improve not only 
the window but the whole room. 




56 




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57 




;dKed \ No. 10872. Unusual double border Ui 

price ;• e pKj sash net, regularweave.bettermedium Hi 

ivory ^g/^sH grade; 42 inches wide: white, ivory L- 

SH^HKj or natural. f- 

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Completing the Bathroom 



Perfect sanitation is, of course, the 
first requirement of the bathroom. 
But the windows need not be sacri- 
ficed to utter bareness. 
The treatment used at this window 
shows two sets of curtains. The 
upper is operated independently from 
the lower. Botli sets are hung upon 
-^-inch nickel rods supported by 
short projecting nickel brackets placed 
on the trim of the window (see A in 
the diagram). The nets selected are 
woven with a strong edye which sim- 
plifies the making. All the sewing 
required is the making of a loose 
casino- at the top to hold the rod, 
above which is a 1-inch heading, and 
a 2-inch hem at the lower edge. It 
is not always feasible to cover the 
upper sash. Where this is the case 
the upper set of curtains may be 
eliminated as the roller shade wi 
give the necessary protection. Othfi] 



nets than those having the woven 
border are practical to use in this way. 
When such a net is chosen a 1-inch 
hem should be used at the center 
edu;e and a roll hem at the back. 
Otherwise the making is the same. 




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No. 1137. A dainty filet marquisette 
curtain, with mercerized Barmen lace 
edge ; 2% yards long ; white, ivory or 
natural. 




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No. 1273. A dainty voile curtain, hem- 
stitched. Torchon lace edge. Venise 
corner motif, with hand drawn work : 
2 l - yards long: white, ivory or natural. 



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For the Nursery Windows 



Cheerful, sunshiny expanses of win- 
dow are perhaps of greater value in 
the children's nursery than in any 
other room of the house. Also there 
is probably no window that requires 
a more serviceable curtain. 

Marquisettes are particularly adapted 
to nursery use. These are made 
32 to 36 inches wide by two- 
and-one-half yards long and 
have a 2-inch hem-stitched 
hem at the center edi>e and 
across the bottom are finished 
with an attractive narrow lace 
edy;e. Many of these have in- 
serts of lace medallions and in- 
sertion which take away the 
severely plain effect of the 
marquisette. These are shown 
caught back in soft folds with 
cord and tassel loops — an at- 
tractive arrangement. 



The rods holding the marquisette 
curtains and overdraperies are attached 
to one fixture (see A in the diagram). 
The marquisettes hang from the inner 
rod and the over curtain from the outer 
rod. The valance is tacked to a flat 
wooden cornice (see B) fastened to the 
window trim with angle 
irons. 




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No. 10267. A dainty crossbar net in 
the medium priced grade: 40 inches 
wide ; white, ivory or natural. 








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No. *>713. Popular allover Swiss pat- >1[ieȤlp No. 10142. Fine imitation 
tern, medium priced grade : 42 inches Ng/iP^ with sunhurst and dots: 
wide ; white, ivory or natural. ■■1Pl i '/&Ji.i wide : white, ivory or natural 

mm 



1 

Filet Net K 
42 inches ^ 



Sunshine for the Nursery 



Sunshine should he the hrst consider- 
ation in the household nursery. At 
the same time we need to keep in 
mind the value of harmonious sur- 
roundings in the early environment of 
the child. Simplicity should be the 
keynote for the furnishings. While 
the window is the threat essential in 
this particular room, so likewise is the 
curtaining, for the window becomes 
a focal point in the decoration of the 
room. 

The net curtains which should he 
sheer and simple in design are made 
to hang straight to the sill from a %- 
inch brass rod, placed between the 
casings of the windows (See A in 
the diagram). The net curtains are 
made with a loose casing at the top 
through which the rod is run, a one- 
inch hem at the center edge, a two- 
inch hem across the bottom and a 
simple roll hem at the back ed<j;e. 



The overdraperies of cretonne are 
hung from a rod placed on the trim 
of the window and supported by a 
fixture carrying two rods (See B). 
From the inner one hangs the cre- 
tonne curtain and upon the outer one 
the valance is shirred. The brass rods 
may be bent to conform with the 
curve of the window. It is, of course, 
necessary to use rod supports at close 
intervals to prevent the rods 
from sagging and spoil- 
ing the effect.